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Title:How We Think: Digital Media and Contemporary Technogenesis
Format Type:Ebook
Author:N. Katherine Hayles
Publisher:University Of Chicago Press
ISBN:0226321428
ISBN 13:
Number of Pages:296
Category:Non fiction, Theory, Technology, Philosophy, Literary criticism, Internet, Contemporary, Science

How We Think: Digital Media and Contemporary Technogenesis by N. Katherine Hayles

PDF, EPUB, MOBI, TXT, DOC How We Think: Digital Media and Contemporary Technogenesis How i do i we think N Katherine Hayles poses this question at the beginning of this bracing exploration of the idea that we think through with and alongside media As the age of print passes and new technologies appear every day this proposition has become far more complicated particularly for the traditionally print based disciplines in the humanities and qualitative social sciences With a rift growing between digital scholarship and its print based counterpart Hayles argues for contemporary technogenesis the belief that humans and technics are coevolving and advocates for what she calls comparative media studies a new approach to locating digital work within print traditions and vice versa .

Hayles examines the evolution of the field from the traditional humanities and how the digital humanities are changing academic scholarship research teaching and publication She goes on to depict the neurological consequences of working in digital media where skimming and scanning or hyper reading and analysis through machine algorithms are forms of reading as valid as close reading once was Hayles contends that we must recognize all three types of reading and understand the limitations and possibilities of each In addition to illustrating what a comparative media perspective entails Hayles explores the technogenesis spiral in its full complexity She considers the effects of early databases such as telegraph code books and confronts our changing perceptions of time and space in the digital age illustrating this through three innovative digital productions Steve Tomasula s electronic novel i TOC i Steven Hall s i The Raw Shark Texts i and Mark Z Danielewski s i Only Revolutions i Deepening our understanding of the extraordinary transformative powers digital technologies have placed in the hands of humanists i How We Think i presents a cogent rationale for tackling the challenges facing the humanities today

How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatics

In this age of DNA computers and artificial intelligence information is becoming disembodied even as the bodies that once carried it vanish into virtuality While some marvel at these changes envisioning consciousness downloaded into a computer or humans beamed i Star Trek i style others view them with horror seeing monsters brooding in the machines In i How We Became Posthuman i N Katherine Hayles separates hype from fact investigating the fate of embodiment in an information age br br Hayles relates three interwoven stories how information lost its body that is how it came to be conceptualized as an entity separate from the material forms that carry it the cultural and technological construction of the cyborg and the dismantling of the liberal humanist subject in cybernetic discourse along with the emergence of the posthuman br br Ranging widely across the history of technology cultural studies and literary criticism Hayles shows what had to be erased forgotten and elided to conceive of information as a disembodied entity Thus she moves from the post World War II Macy Conferences on cybernetics to the novel i Limbo i by cybernetics aficionado Bernard Wolfe from the concept of self making to Philip K Dick s literary explorations of hallucination and reality and from artificial life to postmodern novels exploring the implications of seeing humans as cybernetic systems br br Although becoming posthuman can be nightmarish Hayles shows how it can also be liberating From the birth of cybernetics to artificial life i How We Became Posthuman i provides an indispensable account of how we arrived in our virtual age and of where we might go from here br


Writing Machines

Tracing a journey from the s through the s N Katherine Hayles uses the autobiographical persona of Kaye to explore how literature has transformed itself from inscriptions rendered as the flat durable marks of print to the dynamic images of CRT screens from verbal texts to the diverse sensory modalities of multimedia works from books to technotexts br br Weaving together Kaye s pseudo autobiographical narrative with a theorization of contemporary literature in media specific terms Hayles examines the ways in which literary texts in every genre and period mutate as they are reconceived and rewritten for electronic formats As electronic documents become more pervasive print appears not as the sea in which we swim transparent because we are so accustomed to its conventions but rather as a medium with its own assumptions specificities and inscription practices Hayles explores works that focus on the very inscription technologies that produce them examining three writing machines in depth Talan Memmott s groundbreaking electronic work i Lexia to Perplexia i Mark Z Danielewski s cult postprint novel i House of Leaves i and Tom Phillips s artist s book i A Humument i Hayles concludes by speculating on how technotexts affect the development of contemporary subjectivity br br i Writing Machines i is the second volume in the Mediawork Pamphlets series


Electronic Literature: New Horizons for the Literary

A visible presence for some two decades electronic literature has already produced many works that deserve the rigorous scrutiny critics have long practiced with print literature Only now however with Electronic Literature by N Katherine Hayles do we have the first systematic survey of the field and an analysis of its importance breadth and wide ranging implications for literary study Hayles s book is designed to help electronic literature move into the classroom Her systematic survey of the field addresses its major genres the challenges it poses to traditional literary theory and the complex and compelling issues at stake She develops a theoretical framework for understanding how electronic literature both draws on the print tradition and requires new reading and interpretive strategies Grounding her approach in the evolutionary dynamic between humans and technology Hayles argues that neither the body nor the machine should be given absolute theoretical priority Rather she focuses on the interconnections between embodied writers and users and the intelligent machines that perform electronic texts Dee Morris University of Iowa


My Mother Was a Computer: Digital Subjects and Literary Texts

We live in a world according to N Katherine Hayles where new languages are constantly emerging proliferating and fading into obsolescence These are languages of our own making the programming languages written in code for the intelligent machines we call computers Hayles s latest exploration provides an exciting new way of understanding the relations between code and language and considers how their interactions have affected creative technological and artistic practices br br i My Mother Was a Computer i explores how the impact of code on everyday life has become comparable to that of speech and writing language and code have grown more entangled the lines that once separated humans from machines analog from digital and old technologies from new ones have become blurred i My Mother Was a Computer i gives us the tools necessary to make sense of these complex relationships Hayles argues that we live in an age of i intermediation i that challenges our ideas about language subjectivity literary objects and textuality This process of intermediation takes place where digital media interact with cultural practices associated with older media and here Hayles sharply portrays such interactions how code differs from speech how electronic text differs from print the effects of digital media on the idea of the self the effects of digitality on printed books our conceptions of computers as living beings the possibility that human consciousness itself might be computational and the subjective cosmology wherein humans see the universe through the lens of their own digital age br br We are the children of computers in more than one sense and no critic has done more than N Katherine Hayles to explain how these technologies define us and our culture Heady and provocative i My Mother Was a Computer i will be judged as her best work yet br


How We Think: Digital Media and Contemporary Technogenesis

How i do i we think N Katherine Hayles poses this question at the beginning of this bracing exploration of the idea that we think through with and alongside media As the age of print passes and new technologies appear every day this proposition has become far more complicated particularly for the traditionally print based disciplines in the humanities and qualitative social sciences With a rift growing between digital scholarship and its print based counterpart Hayles argues for contemporary technogenesis the belief that humans and technics are coevolving and advocates for what she calls comparative media studies a new approach to locating digital work within print traditions and vice versa br br Hayles examines the evolution of the field from the traditional humanities and how the digital humanities are changing academic scholarship research teaching and publication She goes on to depict the neurological consequences of working in digital media where skimming and scanning or hyper reading and analysis through machine algorithms are forms of reading as valid as close reading once was Hayles contends that we must recognize all three types of reading and understand the limitations and possibilities of each In addition to illustrating what a comparative media perspective entails Hayles explores the technogenesis spiral in its full complexity She considers the effects of early databases such as telegraph code books and confronts our changing perceptions of time and space in the digital age illustrating this through three innovative digital productions Steve Tomasula s electronic novel i TOC i Steven Hall s i The Raw Shark Texts i and Mark Z Danielewski s i Only Revolutions i Deepening our understanding of the extraordinary transformative powers digital technologies have placed in the hands of humanists i How We Think i presents a cogent rationale for tackling the challenges facing the humanities today


Chaos and Order: Complex Dynamics in Literature and Science

The scientific discovery that chaotic systems embody deep structures of order is one of such wide ranging implications that it has attracted attention across a spectrum of disciplines including the humanities In this volume fourteen theorists explore the significance for literary and cultural studies of the new paradigm of chaotics forging connections between contemporary literature and the science of chaos They examine how changing ideas of order and disorder enable new readings of scientific and literary texts from Newton s Principia to Ruskin s autobiography from Victorian serial fiction to Borges s short stories br br N Katherine Hayles traces shifts in meaning that chaos has undergone within the Western tradition suggesting that the science of chaos articulates categories that cannot be assimilated into the traditional dichotomy of order and disorder She and her contributors take the relation between order and disorder as a theme and develop its implications for understanding texts metaphors metafiction audience response and the process of interpretation itself Their innovative and diverse work opens the interdisciplinary field of chaotics to literary inquiry


Chaos Bound: Orderly Disorder in Contemporary Literature and Science

At the same time that the study of nonlinear dynamics came into its own in the sciences the focus of literary studies shifted toward local fragmentary modes of analysis in which texts were no longer regarded as deterministic or predictable br N br Katherine br Hayles br here br investigates br parallels br between br contemporary br litera br ture br and br critical br theory br and br the br emerging br interdisciplinary br field br known br as br the br science br of br chaos br She br finds br in br both br scientific br and br literary br discourse br new br interpre br tations br of br chaos br which br is br seen br no br longer br as br disorder br but br as br a br locus br of br maximum br information br and br complexity br The br new br paradigm br of br chaos br includes br elements br that br Hayles br shows br were br evident br in br literary br theory br and br literature br before br they br became br prominent br in br the br sciences br She br asserts br that br such br similarities br between br the br natural br and br human br sciences br are br the br result br not br of br direct br influence br but br of br roots br in br a br common br cultural br matrix br Hayles br traces br the br evolution br of br the br concept br of br chaos br and br evaluates br the br work br of br such br theorists br as br Prigogine br Feigenbaum br and br Mandelbrot br for br whom br chaos br entails br an br unpredictably br open br universe br in br which br knowledge br is br limited br to br local br sites br and br scientific br models br can br never br exhaust br the br possibilities br of br the br actual br But br this br view br does br not br imply br that br scientists br have br given br up br the br search br for br global br ex br planations br of br natural br phenomena br for br chaos br is br conceived br of br as br containing br its br own br form br of br order br Hayles br envisions br chaos br as br a br double edged br sword br it br can br be br viewed br either br as br a br recognition br that br disorder br plays br a br more br important br role br in br natural br processes br than br had br hitherto br been br recognized br or br as br an br extension br of br order br into br areas br that br had br hitherto br resisted br formalization br She br examines br structures br and br themes br of br disorder br in br The br Education br of br Henry Adams br Doris br Lessing s br Golden br Notebook br and br works br by br Stanislaw br Lem br Hayles br concludes br by br showing br how br the br writings br of br poststmcturalist br theorists br incorporate br central br features br of br chaos br theory such br as br an br interest br in br relating br local br sites br to br global br stmctures br a br conception br of br order br and br disorder br as br interpenetrating br rather br than br opposed br an br awareness br that br in br complex br systems br small br causes br can br lead br to br massive br effects br and br an br understanding br that br complex br systems br can br be br both br deterministic br and br unpredictable br Chaos br Bound br will br contribute br to br and br enliven br current br debates br among br chaos br theorists br cultural br critics br and br cultural br historians br critical br theorists br literary br critics br interested br in br nineteenth br and br twentieth century br literature br researchers br in br nonlinear br dynamics br and br others br concerned br with br the br relation br between br science br and br culture


Comparative Textual Media: Transforming the Humanities in the Postprint Era

br For the past few hundred years Western cultures have relied on print When writing was accomplished by a quill pen inkpot and paper it was easy to imagine that writing was nothing more than a means by which writers could transfer their thoughts to readers The proliferation of technical media in the latter half of the twentieth century has revealed that the relationship between writer and reader is not so simple From telegraphs and typewriters to wire recorders and a sweeping array of digital computing devices the complexities of communications technology have made mediality a central concern of the twenty first century br br br Despite the attention given to the development of the media landscape relatively little is being done in our academic institutions to adjust In i Comparative Textual Media i editors N Katherine Hayles and Jessica Pressman bring together an impressive range of essays from leading scholars to address the issue among them Matthew Kirschenbaum on archiving in the digital era Patricia Crain on the connection between a child s formation of self and the possession of a book and Mark Marino exploring how to read a digital text not for content but for traces of its underlying code br br br Primarily arguing for seeing print as a medium along with the scroll electronic literature and computer games this volume examines the potential transformations if academic departments embraced a media framework Ultimately i Comparative Textual Media i offers new insights that allow us to understand more deeply the implications of the choices we and our institutions are making br br br Contributors Stephanie Boluk Vassar College Jessica Brantley Yale U Patricia Crain NYU Adriana de Souza e Silva North Carolina State U Johanna Drucker UCLA Thomas Fulton Rutgers U Lisa Gitelman New York U William A Johnson Duke U Matthew G Kirschenbaum U of Maryland Patrick LeMieux Mark C Marino U of Southern California Rita Raley U of California Santa Barbara John David Zuern U of Hawai i at M noa br br br


The Cosmic Web: Scientific Field Models and Literary Strategies in the 20th Century

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Unthought: The Power of the Cognitive Nonconscious

N Katherine Hayles is known for breaking new ground at the intersection of the sciences and the humanities In i Unthought i she once again bridges disciplines by revealing how we think without thinking how we use cognitive processes that are inaccessible to consciousness yet necessary for it to function br br Marshalling fresh insights from neuroscience cognitive science cognitive biology and literature Hayles expands our understanding of cognition and demonstrates that it involves more than consciousness alone Cognition as Hayles defines it is applicable not only to nonconscious processes in humans but to all forms of life including unicellular organisms and plants Startlingly she also shows that cognition operates in the sophisticated information processing abilities of technical systems when humans and cognitive technical systems interact they form cognitive assemblages as found in urban traffic control drones and the trading algorithms of finance capital for instance and these assemblages are transforming life on earth The result is what Hayles calls a planetary cognitive ecology which includes both human and technical actors and which poses urgent questions to humanists and social scientists alike br br At a time when scientific and technological advances are bringing far reaching aspects of cognition into the public eye i Unthought i reflects deeply on our contemporary situation and moves us toward a more sustainable and flourishing environment for all beings


Writing Machines, My Mother Was a Computer: Digital Subjects and Literary Texts, How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatics, The Cosmic Web: Scientific Field Models and Literary Strategies in the 20th Century, Electronic Literature: New Horizons for the Literary, Comparative Textual Media: Transforming the Humanities in the Postprint Era, Chaos and Order: Complex Dynamics in Literature and Science, Unthought: The Power of the Cognitive Nonconscious, How We Think: Digital Media and Contemporary Technogenesis, Chaos Bound: Orderly Disorder in Contemporary Literature and Science